Dendrocalamus

DENDROCALAMUS is a giant tropical clumping bamboo similar to Bambusa often with bigger branches, leaves and hairier culms.

Genus speciesMax HeightMax DiameterMinimum TemperatureComments/Description
D.asper100′8″27FAn impressive ornamental growing rapidly under favorable conditions.  Shoots are large and of the highest quality for food. New shoots are a furry silver brown and velvet to the touch.
D.asper ‘Betung Hitam’100′8″27FA rare black, highly ornamental variety of D.asper. Somewhat slower-growing than the standard D.asper. Culms are dark brown at the base and darken to black a few nodes upwards.
D.borgar60′4″25FFrom Bogar, Java. New shoots have a rough texture.
D.brandisii100′8″26FThe thick-walled culm is similar to but smaller than D.asper. Somewhat open habit with branching starting midway up the culm.  Highest quality shoot producer in the U.S.,  edible raw.
D.brandisii ‘Black’40′8″25FA very attractive, fast growing black bamboo. Live culms are black but dry to a dark brown color, very valuable for furniture etc.
D.copelandii80′8″25FSimilar to D. giganteus but with much denser culm wax and more persistent culm sheaths with darker hairs. Eye-catching appearance and edible shoots
D.giganteus ‘Quail Clone’100″12″28FA native of Burma. One of the largest bamboos in the world. Leaves can be up to 20 inches long and 4 inches wide. Propagated from the large specimen at Quail Botanical Gardens in California.
D.giganteus variegatus100′12″28FSimilar to D.giganteus with variegated leaves.  The leaf variegation is random and appears on a small percentage of the leaves.
D.grandis60′4″24FMedium green culms with silky texture. Leaves feel almost plastic and are slightly glossy.
D.hamiltonii80′7″27FNative from the Himalayas to Laos, with pendulous pruinose culms, leaves up to 15 inches long.
D.jianshuiensis60′4″25FKnown in the US as the ‘Laos seedlings’. Culm tops drooping, pruinose (white powder). Single main branches. Used for construction.
D.jianshuiensis variegatus60′425FSame as D.jianshuiensis with variegated leaves. Culm tops drooping. From Yunnan, used for construction.
D.latiflorus65′8″25FFrom southern China with large, dark green leaves up to 16 inches long and 4 inches wide.
D. latiflorus ‘Mei Nung’65′8″25FSame as D.latiflorus with dark green stripes on the yellow green culm and a few yellow stripes on the leaves. INFECTED WITH  MOSAIC POTEX VIRUS.
D.membranaceus60′4″25FCulms covered in white powder when young. Very straight culms forming loose clumps. Very fast-growing in tropical or sub-tropical conditions.
D.minor25′2″24FWaxy silica bloom, appears “blue”. Tight clumping, no low branching.
D.minor amoenus25′2″24FSame as D.minor with dark green stripes on yellowish internodes.
D.sikkimensis65′6″?Erect, no low branching. Dark green bamboo. Young culms greenish to yellowish brown; becomes brownish red. From Sikkim, Sri Lanka and Yunnan. Edible shoots; Used for construction.
D.sinicus120′12″27FLargest bamboo species in China. Culm heavily pruinose with drooping tip, some basal internodes short and asymmetrical, & ring of yellowish brown silky hair on nodes.
D.sinicus aequotus120′12″27FBetter culm shape, nodes are more level and internodes are straighter
D.sp. ‘Maroochy’33′4″25FBeautiful impressive arching new bamboo with yellow striated culms. Useful as a main feature in a garden. It may be a Gigantochloa.
D.sp. ‘Parker’s Giant’80′12″?BIG! An unidentified, giant, timber bamboo. Discovered by Jim Parker in Hawaii. Massive, thick culms.
D.strictus 60′5″30FThe lower parts of the culms are sometimes solid. Drought tolerant. The most common and most useful bamboo in India.
D.tsiangii20′1.5″?Fairly tight clumping yellowish green culms. Small leaves.
D.tsangii f. viridistriatus20′1.5″?Like standard D.tsiangii but with yellow culms striped with green.
D.validus45′5″?Convex joint with internode slightly contracted inward.
D.variostriata45′4″?Dark green culms with lighter green stripes.  Newly introduced to S. Florida.
D.yunnanicus75′7″?Culms retain pale green coloration. From southeast Yunnan and Vietnam. Edible shoots.
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